Blog Banner
Blog

Movember at ARPS

ARPS joins Movember community of rockstars by supporting the raising of funds, making a difference in mental health & suicide prevention, prostate cancer and testicular cancer this November. We also seek to make a contribution to men living happier, healthier, longer lives.

WHY MEN'S HEALTH?

The state of men’s health is in a crisis. Simply put, men are dying too young. Gender is one of the strongest and most consistent predictors of health and life expectancy. For men, this is not good news. On average, across the world, men die 6 years earlier than women. Moreover, suicide affects men more than women: three quarters of suicides are by men. The World Health Organisation estimates that 510,000 men die from suicide globally each year. That’s one every minute. 

The impact of prostate and testicular cancer on lives is substantial, with prostate cancer being the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Yet this gender-based inequality in health has received little national, regional or global acknowledgement or attention from health policy-makers or healthcare providers. This is exactly why the Movember focuses on men’s health. This is why Mo Bros and Mo Sistas from across the globe become a united voice every Movember, bringing vital funding and attention to the hidden men’s health crisis.

This is not just an issue for men. In order to tackle the problem and work towards a world where future generations of men are not faced with the same issues as today, we need to take action at both an individual and community level. This means engaging men and women, businesses, sporting groups, community organisations, governments, health policy makers and healthcare providers in the efforts to reduce the current gender inequality in health outcomes.

WHY MENTAL HEALTH?

The results of poor mental health can be deadly. Globally, a man dies every minute from suicide. Men, regardless of age group, often don't recognise when they’re experiencing a mental health issue, and may not be comfortable asking for help. The uncomfortable truth is that some stereotypical forms of masculinity are killing men.

WHY PROSTATE CANCER?

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men globally. Globally, more than 1.4 million men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year. Even when successful, treatment can take a toll on the physical and mental health of those affected. We're working towards a day where no man dies of prostate cancer.

WHY TESTICULAR CANCER?

In most cases (better than 95%) a diagnosis of testicular cancer means established treatments and a good outcome. Unfortunately, there are a small proportion of men and boys who do not face that good outcome, and more needs to be done to support these men through diagnosis and treatment and into a long and healthy life after cancer.

MEN'S HEALTH

Globally, men die on average 5 years earlier than women, and for reasons that are largely preventable. Which means that it doesn’t have to be that way: we can all take action to live healthier, happier and longer lives.